Copy of Outgoing Longwave Radiation section of Climate4You.com

Copy of Outgoing Longwave Radiation section of Climate4You.com from: http://www.climate4you.com/GlobalTemperatures.htm 

Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere between 180oW and 179oE (0oE and 359.5oE) and 90oN and 90oS since June 1974 according to the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The thin blue line represents the monthly value, while the thick red line is the simple running 37 month average, nearly corresponding to the running 3 yr average. The infrared wavelength covered is 10.5-12.5 µm (Gruber and Winston 1978) and covers the main part of the atmospheric infrared window. Last month shown: October 2010. Last diagram update: 13 February 2011.

Scatter plot showing outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere between 180oW and 179oE (0oE and 359.5oE) and 90oN and 90oS since June 1974, as function of atmospheric CO2. OLR data from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). CO2 data measured at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, reported as a dry mole fraction defined as the number of molecules of carbon dioxide divided by the number of molecules of dry air (water vapour removed), multiplied by one million (ppm). The red line represent a two-degree polynomial fit, specified in the lower left corner of the diagram. As the amount of atmospheric CO2 has been increasing over the entire period (ignoring annual variations), the x-axis can be seen as as rough timeline from 1974 (left) to 2010 (right). The infrared wavelength covered is 10.5-12.5 µm (Gruber and Winston 1978) and covers the main part of the atmospheric infrared window. Last month shown: October 2010. Last diagram update: 13 February 2011.

(Pic doesn’t work in Firefox but does in IE http://www.climate4you.com/images/OLR%20Global%20NOAA%20and%20UAH%20MSU%20since%201979.gif) Diagram showing outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere between 180oW and 179oE (0oE and 359.5oE) and 90oN and 90oS since December 1978 ( red line; National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the global monthly average lower troposphere temperature (blue line; University of Alabama at Huntsville, USA). The thin lines represent the monthly values, while the thick lines are the simple running 37 month averages, nearly corresponding to running 3 yr averages. The infrared wavelength covered is 10.5-12.5 µm (Gruber and Winston 1978) and covers the main part of the atmospheric infrared window. Last month shown: October 2010 (OLR) and January 2011 (UAH). Last diagram update: 13 February 2011.

  • Click here to download the entire series of NOAA monthly OLR-values since June 1974. Choose first ‘OLR’ then ‘Select field’.
  • Click here to download the entire series of UAH MSU global monthly lower troposphere temperatures since December 1978.
  • Click here to read about data smoothing.

Click here to jump back to the list of contents. Outgoing longwave radiation above Equator

Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere between 180oW and 179oE (0oE and 359.5oE) and 20oN and 20oS since June 1974 according to the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The thin blue line represents the monthly value, while the thick red line is the simple running 37 month average, nearly corresponding to the running 3 yr average. The infrared wavelength covered is 10.5-12.5 µm (Gruber and Winston 1978) and covers the main part of the atmospheric infrared window. Last month shown: October 2010. Last diagram update: 13 February 2011.

Scatter plot showing outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere between 180oW and 179oE (0oE and 359.5oE) and 20oN and 20oS since June 1974, as function of atmospheric CO2. OLR data from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). CO2 data measured at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, reported as a dry mole fraction defined as the number of molecules of carbon dioxide divided by the number of molecules of dry air (water vapour removed), multiplied by one million (ppm). The red line represent a two-degree polynomial fit, specified in the lower left corner of the diagram. As the amount of atmospheric CO2 has been increasing over the entire period (ignoring annual variations), the x-axis can be seen as as rough timeline from 1974 (left) to 2010 (right). The infrared wavelength covered is 10.5-12.5 µm (Gruber and Winston 1978) and covers the main part of the atmospheric infrared window. Last month shown: October 2010. Last diagram update: 13 February 2011.

Diagram showing outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere between 180oW and 179oE (0oE and 359.5oE) and 20oN and 20oS since December 1978 ( red line; National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the global monthly average lower troposphere temperature (blue line; University of Alabama at Huntsville, USA). The thin lines represent the monthly values, while the thick lines are the simple running 37 month averages, nearly corresponding to running 3 yr averages. The infrared wavelength covered is 10.5-12.5 µm (Gruber and Winston 1978) and covers the main part of the atmospheric infrared window. Last month shown: October 2010 (OLR) and January 2011 (UAH). Last diagram update: 13 February 2011.

  • Click here to download the entire series of NOAA monthly OLR-values since June 1974. Choose first ‘OLR’ then ‘Select field’.
  • Click here to download the entire series of UAH MSU global monthly lower troposphere temperatures since December 1978.
  • Click here to read about data smoothing.

Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR; red graph) anomaly at the top of the atmosphere above Equator between 160oE and 160oW since 1979 according to the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center (CPC). Base period: 1979-1995. Surface air temperature change (blue graph) between 20oN and 20oS since 1979, according to HadCRUT3. The thin lines represent the monthly values, while the thick lines is simple running 37 month averages, nearly corresponding to running 3 yr averages. Within the time period 1996-2009, light blue areas indicate periods of surface cooling, and light red areas indicate surface warming. The entire OLR data series goes back to June 1974, but is here shown from January 1979 to enable easy comparison with the temperature diagrams shown above. The infrared wavelength covered is 10.5-12.5 µm (Gruber and Winston 1978) and covers the main part of the atmospheric infrared window. Last month shown: January 2011 (OLR) and December 2010 (HadCRUT3). Last diagram update: 12 February 2011.

  • Click here to download the entire series of NOAA monthly OLR-values since June 1974.
  • Click here to download the entire HadCRUT3 series since 1850.
  • Click here to read about data smoothing.

For the equatorial region, the diagram above suggests a certain chain of events, indicating the existence of a mechanism regulating the surface temperature: Periods of surface warming appears initially to be associated with decreasing outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). After some surface warming, OLR then stops decreasing and instead begins to increase, and after a while, surface air temperature then begins to decrease, etc. This chain of events is clearly illustrated by, e.g., the time period around the 1998 El Niño event (diagram above). Part of the explanation of the above succession of events might be that tropical surface warming leads to enhanced atmospheric convectional transport of heat to high levels of the atmosphere above the Equator, resulting in enhanced longwave radiation at the top of the atmosphere. This, in turn, eventually leads to surface cooling, which results in reduced atmospheric convection, etc. Also the potential connection to variations in tropical sea surface temperatures and the tropical cloud cover is interesting, and should be considered in a more detailed analysis. Click here to jump back to the list of contents. Outgoing longwave radiation above the Arctic

Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere between 180oW and 179oE (0oE and 359.5oE) and 70oN and 90oN since June 1974 according to the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The thin blue line represents the monthly value, while the thick red line is the simple running 37 month average, nearly corresponding to the running 3 yr average. The infrared wavelength covered is 10.5-12.5 µm (Gruber and Winston 1978) and covers the main part of the atmospheric infrared window. Last month shown: October 2010. Last diagram update: 13 February 2011.

Scatter plot showing outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere between 180oW and 179oE (0oE and 359.5oE) and 70oN and 90oN since June 1974, as function of atmospheric CO2. OLR data from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). CO2 data measured at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, reported as a dry mole fraction defined as the number of molecules of carbon dioxide divided by the number of molecules of dry air (water vapour removed), multiplied by one million (ppm). The red line represent a two-degree polynomial fit, specified in the lower left corner of the diagram. As the amount of atmospheric CO2 has been increasing over the entire period (ignoring annual variations), the x-axis can be seen as as rough timeline from 1974 (left) to 2010 (right). The infrared wavelength covered is 10.5-12.5 µm (Gruber and Winston 1978) and covers the main part of the atmospheric infrared window. Last month shown: October 2010. Last diagram update: 13 February 2011.

Diagram showing outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere between 180oW and 179oE (0oE and 359.5oE) and 70oN and 90oN since December 1978 ( red line; National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the global monthly average lower troposphere temperature (blue line; University of Alabama at Huntsville, USA). The thin lines represent the monthly values, while the thick lines are the simple running 37 month averages, nearly corresponding to running 3 yr averages. The infrared wavelength covered is 10.5-12.5 µm (Gruber and Winston 1978) and covers the main part of the atmospheric infrared window. Last month shown: October 2010 (OLR) and January 2011 (UAH). Last diagram update: 13 February 2011.

  • Click here to download the entire series of NOAA monthly OLR-values since June 1974. Choose first ‘OLR’ then ‘Select field’.
  • Click here to download the entire series of UAH MSU global monthly lower troposphere temperatures since December 1978.
  • Click here to read about data smoothing.

Click here to jump back to the list of contents. Outgoing longwave radiation above Antarctica

Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere between 180oW and 179oE (0oE and 359.5oE) and 70oS and 90oS since June 1974 according to the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The thin blue line represents the monthly value, while the thick red line is the simple running 37 month average, nearly corresponding to the running 3 yr average. The infrared wavelength covered is 10.5-12.5 µm (Gruber and Winston 1978) and covers the main part of the atmospheric infrared window. Last month shown: October 2010. Last diagram update: 13 February 2010.

Scatter plot showing outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere between 180oW and 179oE (0oE and 359.5oE) and 70oS and 90oS since June 1974, as function of atmospheric CO2. OLR data from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). CO2 data measured at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, reported as a dry mole fraction defined as the number of molecules of carbon dioxide divided by the number of molecules of dry air (water vapour removed), multiplied by one million (ppm). The red line represent a two-degree polynomial fit, specified in the lower left corner of the diagram. As the amount of atmospheric CO2 has been increasing over the entire period (ignoring annual variations), the x-axis can be seen as as rough timeline from 1974 (left) to 2010 (right). The infrared wavelength covered is 10.5-12.5 µm (Gruber and Winston 1978) and covers the main part of the atmospheric infrared window. Last month shown: October 2010. Last diagram update: 13 February 2011.

Diagram showing outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere between 180oW and 179oE (0oE and 359.5oE) and 70oS and 90oS since December 1978 ( red line; National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the global monthly average lower troposphere temperature (blue line; University of Alabama at Huntsville, USA). The thin lines represent the monthly values, while the thick lines are the simple running 37 month averages, nearly corresponding to running 3 yr averages. The infrared wavelength covered is 10.5-12.5 µm (Gruber and Winston 1978) and covers the main part of the atmospheric infrared window. Last month shown: October 2010 (OLR) and January 2011 (UAH). Last diagram update: 13 February 2011.

  • Click here to download the entire series of NOAA monthly OLR-values since June 1974. Choose first ‘OLR’ then ‘Select field’.
  • Click here to download the entire series of UAH MSU global monthly lower troposphere temperatures since December 1978.
  • Click here to read about data smoothing.

Click here to jump back to the list of contents.

As you can see there’s no correlation, inverse or otherwise, between OLR to rising CO2, the so-called control knob of the climate:

MaunaLoaMarch2013-400x305

See also: no relation between OLR & water vapour: http://planetaryvision.blogspot.com.au/2015/05/no-relation-between-water-vapour-and.html

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